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the challenges of the debt crisis of high gas prices and now the fiscal cliff with the american consumer on a durable good saying we think at the end of the day they will do the right thing and this will be resolved. >> what are you seeing out there? you sell all kinds of cars. what are the hottest brands? whether it is luxury, economy brands, what are you selling most and what's hot? >> i think the most important development in the marketplace is the embracing of fuel economy by the american consumer in an unprecedented way. what's interesting, it is not hybrids and electrics they are embracing. here's the basic equation. we are saying you can have the same size vehicle with the same speed but a 25 to 30% improvement in fuel efficiency with traditional technology that you get your money back in two to three years. that's a winning proposition to the american consumer. >> me let me ask you about something else. most auto companies market to men, and yet women are making the lion's share of financial decisions. how come the auto sector isn't marketing to women? is your industry behind the
for the american economy. >> an added wrinkle to the fiscal cliff talks is the debt ceiling, with the government on pace to reach its borrowing limit early next year. the white house stated its position on the 14th amendment, which some theory rise is a way for the president to raise the debt limit independently, should republicans attempt to use it as a negotiating tool. >> i can say that this administration does not believe that the 14th amendment gives the president the power to ignore the debt ceiling, period. >> the fiscal cliff talks reached a new low yesterday when, somehow, the new york jets got dragged into it on the senate floor. >> it's not one of my favorite teams, but it's really, really fun to watch, and that's the new york jets. coach ryan, he's got a problem. he has three quarterbacks, sanchez, he's got tim tebow, he's got another guy. he can't decide who their quarterback is going to be. that's the same problem republicans are having. romney's gone, but he's still in the background. we have mcconnell and we have boehner. who is the quarterback, mr. president? who is the quarterb
to ignore the debt ceiling, period. >> the fiscal cliff talks reached a new low yesterday when, somehow, the new york jets got dragged into it on the senate floor. >> it's not one of my favorite teams, but it's really, really fun to watch, and that's the new york jets. coach ryan, he's got a problem. he has three quarterbacks, sanchez, he's got tim tebow, he's got another guy. he can't decide who their quarterback is going to be. that's the same problem republicans are having. romney's gone, but he's still in the background. we have mcconnell and we have boehner. who is the quarterback, mr. president? who is the quarterback? >> there's some confusion about who the quarterback is on the republican side. that is, of course, quite common when you don't have the white house, but there's no doubt about who the quarterback is on the democratic side. the quarterback on the democratic side is the president of the united states. and unfortunately, he keeps throwing interceptions, and we're moving backward and backward and backward towards the goal line. >> i have a headache. >> should they not b
fight over the debt ceiling as well. the fiscal cliff and the debt ceiling, are they connected? >> the white house wants them to be connected. they actually think if neck get a deal decoupling the bush tax cuts, having entitlement reform in dealing with the debt ceiling that is getting a raise and not having to worry about it for another couple of years, that's what they want. house republicans have indicated that, look, they actually might want it to kick the can down the road, make a deal on taxes but kick it down the road where they have more leverage. president obama was asked about that earlier this week and said he doesn't want to play the debt ceiling game anymore. that's where republicans have more leverage than then do on other matters. >> all right. senior political editor mark murray, have a great weekend, sir. >> i want to bring in congressman peter welch from vermont. good to see you again. talked to you last weekend on msnbc. at that point you told me that you thought there was a 50/50 shot we'd go off the so-called fiscal cliff. today speaker boehner said talks w
and say we didn't go off the fiscal cliff and the debt goes from $16 trillion to $20 trillion a couple years down the road to $25 trillion. nothing changes in washington, dc. you tax. you still spend. maybe it is time to take the medicine congressman and go over the fiscal cliff and fix the problem. >>guest: there is no fiscal cliff. there is a fiscal slope. the earth doesn't stop spinning, the sun will come up, the moon will come up and we will have to do things in john. taxes will go up and the democratic party and hopefully some responsible republicans will vote to make certain that we remove this tax cut that would take place. >>eric: no talk about responsible democrats to stop spending so were, or cut back the spending, not just cutting back the increase rate in spending but item spending cuts. >>guest: the rate of increase doesn't have anything to do with the spain people are suffering whether they are middle class or poor. we were talking about the so-called fiscal cliff, if that happens, automatically taxes are going to go up for everyone. maybe, then, someone would ask, who wa
a function of doing both of the things you talk about, joe. having an agreement to avoid the debt, the fiscal cliff, and then having a down payment on actually getting the $4 trillion identified. >> howard dean is a deficit hawk. liberal, but he is a deficit hawk. he doesn't say maybe if we can't get a deal together, maybe we'd be okay with the fiscal cliff. he says that is the best deal for everyone, the best deal for progressives, just to do it. to go back to the clinton era rates. you get rid of three quarters of the deficit just on tax increases at that point. >> and he says you get defense cuts. >> you can't get defense cuts any other way. and he's not the only one. there's a lot of people on the left and there's quite a few people on the right. i'm glad you're optimistic and a lot of ceos and guys in your position -- if you run a company, you don't need consumers petrified and business people petrified. this is the last thing we need if you run a company. i understand you have a horse in the game. >> but you also have the double trigger. if you go over the cliff, we've got the debt ceil
mcconnell when back-and-forth on fiscal cliff issues and a proposal to raise the debt ceiling. here is part of their exchange. >> yesterday afternoon, i came to the floor and offered president obama's proposal on the fiscal cliff to show that neither he nor democrats in congress are acting in good faith in these negotiations. with just a few weeks ago before a potentially entirely avoidable blow to the economy, the president proposed a plan the members of his own party will even vote for. he is not interested in a balanced agreement, not particularly interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff, and clearly not interested at all in cutting any spending. with the president is really in, as we learned just yesterday, is getting as much taxpayer money as he can, first by raising taxes on small businesses who he believes are making too much money, and then on everybody else. not so he can lower the debt or the deficit, but so he can spend to his heart's content. for months, the president has been saying that all he wanted to raise taxes on the top 2% so he can tackle the debt and the deficit. howeve
it will not happen, no vote today on the debt ceiling, fiscal cliff proposal to basically the breaking news is we're back where we started. melissa: what is the hottest stock on wall street these days. trading under. the bidding war for my favorite bank analyst. i love dick bove. speaker he is in purgatory. a billion dollars unauthorized trade was described as a rogue trader. presumption of innocence, he was arrested earlier in the week. take the firm, the firm has been closed down since then. dick bove has been in purgatory. sources are telling us bove reseed essentially 17 offers to join him, he is now down to five, he has contracted form in five firms. he believes he'll be making the decision on which of these five firms he will go to in the coming days. he says he is close to a deal to revitalize the firm, said he would stay with rockdale. if i tell you this. said he is t has to make up itsd soon, did not say which way he was going. my gut talking to people what he is probably going to leave. who are they? these are midsize firms who basically know he is a well-known analyst. he opened stores
of the fiscal cliff stuff. do we raise the retirement age to ease our debt? >>> treasury secretary tim geithner will speak later to steve leisman about the fiscal cliff talks. we'll have a preview and discuss what traders want to hear. wooohooo....hahaahahaha! oh...there you go. wooohooo....hahaahahaha! i'm gonna stand up to her! no you're not. i know. you know ronny folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than a witch in a broom factory. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of americans retire on their terms. when they want. where they want. doing what they want. ameriprise. the strength of a leader in retirement planning. the heart of 10,000 advisors working with you one-to-one. together for your future. ♪ >>> goldman sachs earlier today cutting its outlook for gold and prices are closing right now. we have about a $2 loss in the gold market. sharon epperson is
. charles: on that note, we are talking about the fiscal cliff. earlier today, president obama brought the debt ceiling debate, or would be debate into the picture. it feels like a lot of the work that you do -- people say okay, we spent 100 grand on this or maybe watching the shrimp on a treadmill. it's not a big deal. >> is a big deal because the way you eliminate a trillion dollar deficit is a billion dollars at a time. the wavy you get a billion dollars is 100 million or $10 million at a time. so what is our excuse? can we say that it is okay to waste money and hundreds of thousands of small areas that add up to trillions of dollars? or do we have to look at big areas? what i would put forward is congress isn't doing their job and how they write it and oversight it. i still pick up any of my feet on the ground because the penny is were 3.5 cents. anyone in america who is struggling today, we don't have the luxury of ignoring stupidity and waste anymore. charles: i have less than a minute. i have to squeeze this in here. you think we could be a transitional transformative point in t
to debt a handle on the fiscal cliff, we cannot lose sight of their urgent priority of making sure we have job growth -- job creation, to say the least. many of the components you have outlined -- that both of you have -- it comprised of the broad description of the fiscal cliff whether it is the expiring tax cut provisions, the expiring tax cut extensions, and spending cuts as well. if you consider more, which of those would you consider having the biggest bang for the buck in terms of economic impact of those that we are discussing here today? >> it is a given that we will extend the current tax rates for taxpayers that make less than $250,000 on an annual basis. that is absolutely necessary. when you consider the other things that are happening -- in terms of the bang for the buck, the emergency unemployment insurance program is very effective. it is small in the grand scheme of things. cbo is estimating it would costs per calendar year about $33 million. but the economic opportunity for job growth compared to the unemployment rate would be measurably more than that. we are down to go t
on the fiscal cliff be the grand bargain that puts the debt issue to bed or just enough to get past the cliff? or could the president get big concessions from john boehner and force liberals to sign off a-o a big inteelgtsment change? much more talk the past week about hillary clinton gearing up to run for president. in a new washington post poll, her numbers like like they would give her a quick route to the nomination. and a strong chance to win the white house for a clinton third term. join me and david ignatius, john harris, michele caruso ka fwrar cabrera for a great round table. here's what's coming up on "meet the press." ma,ñ0ót5 behind?n00o thisu this morning i'll go inside negotiations with two lawmakers close to them, dick durbin of illinois and congressman, one of boehner's top advisers. i spent time on capitol hill this week. one question i'm dealing with this morning, what has actually changed since last summer's debt debacle? my sense is we may be closer to a deal than some of all the publicr7ó(w- leads to you believe. we'll talk about that. with our political round ta
fiscal cliff. since we had another fiscal cliff type scenario with the debt limit that credited the scenario that led to this, and this idea i voted against that, put bad things to happen at one time because that will force washington to do something. well, surprise, it didn't work. here we are, again, facing this. we have two issues to face. number one is in the immediate term avoid doing damage, and avoid doing harm, and so we need to look for a way to accomplish that in the short term. we have to, we have to, we have to have a conversation about getting the fiscal house in order. i heard bob talk about that. it's fundamentally true. spending a trillion dollars a year more than we take in. that's a fact. address it. i approach the issue with a following belief that the only way to get that in order is through rapid economic growth. there's no taxes you can raise to bring this debt down. what the president's proposing does not raise the revenue to make a significant dent on the debt, but it will make a didn't on job creation, particularly middle class job creation, and that's w
of santa barbara. we have gone over the fiscal cliff here in california. we are billions of dollars in debt. democrats and the labor unions are bankrupting this state. if the democratic party is so good, then why are we bankrupt? don't you think it's time the unions, instead of spending billions of dollars on political campaigns give that money back to the membership so they can maybe pay their own wages and tax bears and people like me that live on fixed incomes don't have to be taxed out of our homes and lose the money we have worked hard to make? guest: you have worked hard. number one, i cannot comment on the california situation. i just don't know enough about it. reports are that things are starting to turn around a little over there. it's tough to pass a budget if when you have the fiscal majority requirement. second, how we got here, it's not unions. wages for americans have been going down the past 115 years. people are not keeping up with inflation. the average american worker has taken a 2011 pay cut when you compare what they made 10 years ago to what they're making now. -- $200
ceiling orificical cliff. it was the debt ceiling. >> steve: first fiscal cliff of our lifetime. >> gretchen: it feels like it has been here a longg time and they were talking about the importance of the day to get the bill actually through. i feel like they can jump through hoops and get past that, too. >> eric: had it has to originate in the house and sent over marked up to the senate and point being there is a lot of hoop to jump through. you know. rudy guiliani is on hannity last night. he was approached with the same sort of problem in new york city . listen to how he handled it >> i was given a report that said you have to raise taxes and said nothing about reducing spending. i was not an economic expert. i became one after becoming mayor in new york. i said it makes no sense. if i raises tax now. i will have to do it in two or four years. i will try to do something different. lower taxings. i in the beginning but a little bit and two or three years lower taxings. we had a three billion surplus and unemployment dropped from 10.5 to six percent . the city was humming. bowle
. it will probably end up getting rolled into the broader fight over the fiscal cliff. it is unlikely they will get pay fors. >> ed henry, thank you very much. the super hero versus the dancer. we are both trying to save the nation's debt mess. does allen have me beat? ♪ >>> we could be on the verge of breaking a major log jam in the united states senate. you are looking at harry reid at issue. whether they will allow food in the cafeteria for a special screening of the movie "lincoln." and now our senior capitol hill producer. chad? >> this is interesting. initially there were report these were going to do this screening in the actual senate chamber. that requires a full dispensation of the senate. they don't typically allow the chamber to be used for anything else other than business. there was a big to do when they cleared the chamber to use it for a memorial service to the late robert bird. it was 50 years since they used it for something else. this will be in the congressional auditorium which is underground. we heard harry reid is seeking a waiver to allow food in the auditorium. particular
up getting past this fiscal cliff by creating another one with the debt ceiling. the best way out -- we passed a bill yesterday on the floor, it passed 98-0. that does not make news. it came out of committee -- a defense authorization bill. you had a majority and minority that work together. all kinds of amendments that were agreed to and voted on. and it passed. that is what we have not been doing. we have had bills come out of both leader offices, airdrop on the floor, that are intended not to pass but to show differences. if we can just go through regular order, things would be just fine. >> they have regular order in the house. >> regular order in the house has not brought compromise. i would like to see things go to regular order. i am a big proponent of allowing them to work -- we do need to recognize that in the era of divided government, where you have one party in control of the white house and another in control of the house, you are going to have a lot of give and take. in that environment, commonplace is essential. if you go through the last campaign, it is not that bi
with the fiscal cliff and dealing with our debt situation and not have a debt ceiling hanging out there as a diversionary but dangerous issue. but for some reason, inexplicable, the minority leader, the republican leader, changed his mind. now, he said on the floor well, important measures deserve 60 votes, but when he brought it up earlier, he acted as if he was in favor of it, he was offering it. and now, of course, essaying no, he's going to object to his own resolution. i wish he would reconsider. again, playing -- using the debt ceiling as leverage, using the debt ceiling as a threat, using the debt ceiling as a way to achieve a different agenda is dangerous. it's playing with fire. and yet, with the opportunity to take that off the table, reassure the markets, the minority leader blinked. i don't know why. it's hard to figure out the strategy that he's employing, but we would hope on this side of the aisle -- and i think i speak for all of us -- that he would reconsider and perhaps early next week let us vote on his own resolution. i yield the floor. mr. schumer: i notice th
fiscal cliff. he says consequences will be far worse than last year's debt ceiling fight, when the u.s. credit rating was downgraded for the first time ever. if a deal is not reached, he told our poppy harlow, the ripple effect will be felt worldwide. >> this single issue has a seismic effect on the rest of the world, that we have never been as connected and the domino effect of a bad outcome here will have significant negative consequences, domestically and around the world. >>> take a minute to come over to your tv, if you can. penn state has another pr problem on its hands this morning. the university's kai omega sorority is being investigated for stereotyping latinos after a picture showed up on the site tumblr. the photo showed sorority members wearing fake mustaches and dressed in somberos while holding signs that say, "i don't cut grass, i smoke it." the president of the chapter has apologized. is that enough, soledad? >> ladies, as your multi-ethnic friend, let me help you. help me help you. no dressing up as any stereotypical figures. just stop. call a friend. get advice. do
, not limited to just worrying about the debt and the fiscal cliff and such. our program today, i am welcoming you. stonewall clerk will welcome you as well. and riley will give the polling results, and ron brown will do the interview and then we will have a panel discussion. it will be a terrific day. please turn these babies off. again, welcome. is executive vice president of allstate. joan has been a terrific partner with us over the last four years. she is responsible for all relations for allstate. prior to joining that company, she did similar work with monsanto. she is a consummate marketing and communications strategist, which is what this town of washington is all about. that you very much, and dwell come our friends here. -- and welcome our friends here. [applause] >> ok, good morning, and thank you so much for that kind introduction. "the atlantic" and "national journal" have been terrific partners in this effort. i thank them very much for that, and many thanks to edward reilly, who will take us through the data today, and also for jeremy, an associate, who was the lead researcher
in place. and it recalls that fiscal cliff, but the deal of made a year and a half ago, the republicans, democrats and president signed off on this, allowing tax increases to go back in place. and they signed on to half a trillion in cuts, in domestic programs and half a trillion in defense, understand what this is as a conservative, defense is 16% of the budget. other 84% gets half a trillion, defense getting half a trillion. the democrats are welcoming this to happen. >> the guy who ran second to mitt romney, many argue now with -- i think this is -- republicans are running with tail between their legs, and they are a lighter blue. >> they are referred to as cheap democrats. neil: you are persona nongratta now. or party we knew is gone. >> i'm hoping that is not the case. i'm hoping we'll have new members come in. and you know, we -- just saw it, i got involved in not a fiscal thing but it had to do with a u.n. treaty that the left's to s to hoist on u.s. that thing was going to pass, we got involved, an organization that i run, patriot voices, we stirred up the pot, got people to pay
revenue, this fiscal cliff issue much larger. talks about the debt ceiling and what that means for next year. treasury saying that sometime early next year they will run out of those extraordinary measures and the u.s. will have to raise the debt ceiling or default. back to you. ashley: very good point. rich edson in d.c. thanks very much. tracy: our next guest says, forget taxes. washington needs to focus on cutting entitlement spending if we want to prevent a battle between old and young americans. diana further got roth, senior fellow at man hat taken institute and joins us now. diana, seems to me raising the retirement age is the simplest thing you could do yet we're not talking about that. >> well, we certainly should be because part of the deficit problem, a great part, is entitlements, social security and medicare, keep adding fiscal burdens as people's live expectancy increases and it's great that people are living longer but when social security was first thought of the life expectancy was only 67. now it is around 85. we need to raise retirement ages or somehow thinking about
of the fiscal cliff. a voice of reason on the debt deal. and tuesday it's mission critical time. "squawk" goes to washington to talk with senators and congressman involved in negotiations. "squawk box" starting at 6:00 a.m. eastern. year-end event. so, the 5.3-liter v8 silverado can tow up to 9,600 pounds? 315 horsepower. what's that in reindeer-power? [ laughs ] [ pencil scratches ] [ male announcer ] chevy's giving more. get the best offer of the year -- 0% apr financing for 60 months plus $1,000 holiday bonus cash. plus trade up for an additional $1,000 trade-in allowance. hurry. bonus cash ends january 2nd. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 at schwab, we're committed to offering you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 low-cost investment options-- tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like our exchange traded funds, or etfs tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 which now have the lowest tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 operating expenses tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 in their respective tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lipper categories. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lower than spdr tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and even lower than vanguard. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2
and getting that. >> it's a statement. >> let's talk about the fiscal cliff. also on the radar this morning, after president obama and house speaker john boehner both were tight-lipped how the negotiations went. the co-founder of the fix the debt campaign, he was asked about the chances of striking a deal to avoid the cliff. >> it's probably more like a 40% chance we'll actually get it done before the end of the year. probably 25% chance we'll get it done right after the end of the year. and then there's that horrible 35% chance that we'll still go over the cliff and have pure chaos. but i think the chances of getting it done now are better. i think that's what's key. >> be sure to tune in tomorrow for the fiscal cliff coverage live from washington. mission critical, rise above d.c., all day long. becky quick, jim cramer, maria bartiromo holding their feet to the fire about where they stand on the fiscal cliff and how they'll do their part to rise above partisan politics and reach a deal. now, there are some bowles comments. 40%, yeah, but the odds are much better. they're still 35% chance
should compromise and hear both sides. >> i think you should go off the fiscal cliff. americans are barreling down the road that's debt. there is a fork in the road. on the left are all our kids and our grand kids and the next generations. and on the right the road on the right is the fiscal cliff. really that the is choice if we don't do something about it we are going to go anyway. do you run over the kids with the car or do you take the other road which is not a good one but better than running over your kids fiscal cliff. it's a hard choice. >> but if we don't do it, if we don't go over the fiscal cliff the democrats will never cut a dime in spending. >> why would the democrats want change? if the bush tax cuts are going to expire they are saying this is great because this means the rich are going to pay more money, we are going to have more money to spend. they are already spending a the lo. they are saying why would we want change? this is great we have more money to spend. >> nancy pelosi saying why aren't we voting on middle class tax cuts? get to the other stuff. put th
's absolutely right, carl. a lot of people have been drawing similarities between the current fiscal cliff negotiations and that debt ceiling standoff from last year. so we have one former insider who joins us right now. he's been through this before. he probably knows how to read the signs better than just about anybody out there. bill daley was the white house chief of staff under president obama during the debt ceiling negotiations last year. mr. daley, thank you very much for joining us this morning. >> thanks for having me. >> reporter: we were just trying to figure out what to make of this. all morning long we've been saying it's relatively good news that we haven't within hearing from the principalprincipals. what does it mean now that speaker boehner is going to be addressing the house at noon. >> i think it's a strong sign there is movement. i don't know that. i'm not on the inside. i don't know what's going on. i doubt the speaker is going to stand up and speak to the body and say nothing's happening and we're not going anywhere and just give a partisan speech. so i'm hopeful tha
. but limiting or even charitable deductions could be part of a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. one man of the tax policy center says given our national debt? sort of tax hikes are inevitable. >> one way is to tax the same income we have right now but get more revenue. the alternative is to tax more. get rid of the deductions and the exemptions, the things that reduce or taxable income. we tax more at today's rates and we bring in more revenue. >> reporter: itemized deductions are the first form of tax breaks on the table. used by 30% of tax payers they cost the government over $200 billion a year. about a fifth of this year's deficit. charitable donations alone cost $40 billion a year. but ending them is costly too. >> anybody who gives money away, taxes will go up. they'll pay more. that's what we're all about trying to get rid of these. but at the same time they'll likely give less to charity. if i don't get the deduction, it's going to cost me more after taxes to give away money. >> reporter: and say nonprofit leaders, if the rich stop giving, the poor stop getting. >> we're here to
. congress had trouble putting together a deal. now the u.s. may be heading for the fiscal cliff. what does that mean for you and your investments? we have the jobs report today for a brief moment. we weren't worried about the fiscal cliff. now, we are back. what do you make of it? >> the jobs report was okay. there are some signs of very modest improvement in jobs. the good news is we have not really lost momentum and i will put that in the victory column. from a very short-term perspective, it is the fiscal cliff that is on everyone's mind. consumer sentiment is starting to decline. that suggested everyone seems to be focused on the fiscal cliff. when you are focused on uncertainty, what do you do, you do nothing. those are the major implementations for the economy. cheryl: i can hear the hesitancy in your voice. a lot of our guests are saying the same thing. they are afraid of what washington will do or maybe not do. your outlook is a bit more bullish than some of your colleagues. what are you saying in the second half of 2013 that others are not? >> on a very short-term basis, we have n
discussions on the fiscal cliff and maybe the debt keeling and -- keeling -- ceiling and roll all this together. >> i don't think the debt creelhags a play in -- place in all of this. i think we continue the mcconnell rule which says the president sends over, 2/3 of the congress ons then that is overturned -- obtains then that is overturned so we -- objects then that is overturned. that is holding hostage anything for the future. there are two steps we need to take. one is now, which by passing the middle income tax cut, the decoupling of that from the high-end tax cut is a liberation in terms of discussion on how we go forward. a package that recognizes that we have to establish priorities, that means value some investments more than others and make cuts, and make sure that what we -- judgments we make on revenue and judgments we make on cuts are all in furtherance of growth. in our economy. i have confidence in the sense of responsibility all of our colleagues have to our country, that we'll be able to reach an agreement. and again, not to make it a too complicated -- a good fir
. that's complicating the fiscal cliff discussions. mitch mcconnell yesterday proposed a vote on a measure that would give the president the authority to increase the debt ceiling without congressional input. this is something that the white house has proposed as part of their fiscal cliff proposal. it's a nonstarter for republicans. but he wanted to put it on the floor to show that even democrats don't support giving the president that kind of authority. he did that and harry reid turned around and said, let's see if we can do it with a simple majority for 51 votes and democrats it appeared had made sure they had that and then mitch mcconnell in return ended up objecting to the very thing he propose eed. take a listen. >> now the republican leader objects his own idea. i guess we have a filibuster of his own bill. >> so this was some maneuvering that went on. mitch mcconnell won the day when he proposed a vote overall on the entire fiscal cliff proposal and harry reid objected to it. it's a little bit of a back and forth going on in the midst of these talks that are now reope
's exactly what one former senator is doing to avoid the fiscal cliff. in a new web video, senator alan simpson dancing gangnam style to get his debt reduction message out to young people. >> stop instagramming your breakfast and tweeting your problems and getting on youtube so you can see began nagangnamstyle. start using those precious social media skills to go out and sign people up on this baby, three people a week. let it grow and don't forget, take part or get taken apart. boy, these old coots will clean out the treasury before you get there. >> greta: it's part of a campaign to get young people involved in the fiscal debate. is the video effective? go to we're back in 90 seconds. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- you can stay in and share something... ♪ ♪ ...or you can get out there with your friends and actually share something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. >> greta: victims of superstorm sandy blasting the feds in a 60 seconds. first, let's go
the fiscal cliff. in a new web video, senator alan simpson dancing gangnam style to get his debt reduction message out to young people. >> stop instagramming your breakfast and tweeting your problems and getting on youtube so you can see began nagangnamstyle. start using those precious social media skills to go out and sign people up on this baby, three people a week. let it grow and don't forget, take part or get taken apart. boy, these old coots will clean out the treasury before you get there. >> greta: it's part of a campaign to get young people involved in the fiscal debate. is the video effective? go to we're back in 90 seconds. the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on all purchases, plus a 50% annual bonus. and everyone...but her likes 50% more cash. but i'm upping my game. do you want a candy cane? yes! do you want the puppy? yes! do you want a tricycle? yes! do you want 50 percent more cash? no! ♪ festive. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase plus a 50% annual bonus on the cash you earn. i
have had to report on the posturing and talking point known as the fiscal cliff. decisions about taxes and spending are extremely important especially when we are adding $300 billion a day to our debt but the constant bickering of dueling politicians on both sides of the aisle, the endless kicking of the can, the brinkmanship as we approach that disaster is making all americans angry. i think you turned off and tuned out and i don't blame you. who can sit still and watch our country dragged into ruinous-and not be a little frustrated? as i said many times i came here from europe 40 years ago and instantly felt the warm embrace of a truly generous and free society and now i see america galloping down the european road. we have already reached european levels of debt and our leaders give as political pablum. we deserve better than this. the other night i left the fiscal cliff behind and took a walk through new york city. it was great. the lights, the christmas tree, rockefeller center, crowds of people with their children. was such a switch. "varney and company" will not walk away from t
speaker john boehner who is making an announcement on the fiscal cliff right now. >> his promise to bring a balanced approach is mainly tax hikes. and does not solve our debt crisis, it increases spending. our plan meets these standards, cuts spending and paves the way for real job growth in our country. in the five weeks since we've signaled our willingness to forge an agreement with the president, he's never put forth a plan that meets these standards. and frankly, it's why we don't have an agreement today. the longer the white house slow walks this discussion, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff, and the more american jobs are placed in jeopardy. >> good morning. the president has said on a daily basis that we should be passing a balanced plan. but what we hear from the president is continuing only discussion on one side of the ledger. it has always been about tax rate increases, and nothing about spending. and we insist, say, look, mr. president, let's talk about a balanced plan, but where are your specifics on the spending cuts? even his own advisers say that any kind of
the analysis of the fiscal cliff impact was too rosy? >> projections are very difficult. it's very difficult to take into account the effect on confidence. as i said, consumers have been confident. they've maintained that confidence. but look at what happened during the debt limit debacle a year ago august. look at how the economy came to a grinding halt at that point. >> and that's your fear that the cliff could just freeze consume earp confidence and that's something you can't right now project as an economist? >> no one wants to go over the fiscal cliff. worse would be for the president to sign a bad bill. >> all right. alan krueger, chairman of the president's counscil on economi advisers. mr. krueger, nice to see you that month. i'll see you next month, i promise. >> thank you, chuck. >>> trivia time, jim demint's decision to step down 0 means south carolina will have two seats on the ballot in 2014. who was elected the last time both of south carolina's senate seats were on the ballot in the same election? strom thurmond, of course, and the longest serving junior senator perhaps in the
the fiscal cliff and caterpillar's ceo joins us from the nyse to talk about the fix the debt campaign and more. you know anything we don't know, doug, that you can tell us about how this finally looks and whether we do it? >> i don't know if i know any more than you do or not, joe, but we've all been working hard to impress upon our leadership in washington how important this is not to go over the cliff. we had good sessions with republican leadership, democratic leaderships and with president obama in the white house. nobody over there wants to go over the cliff at this time, there's nothing that wants to do it. >> once we get over it, we hope it's a bridge to something that will help you and caterpillar compete better in the world. after the cliff, what do you want? is there any emphasis on corporate tax reform that we need or how to bring $2 trillion back to this country? aren't those things, did you talk about any of those or the cliff? >> we talked about all of those, long-term competitiveness for our country, immigration reform that needs to happen, and there's a lot of bipartis
for more spending. >> the whole discussion around the fiscal cliff is a stimulus program, rather stimulus by further tax cut but a 98 percent or for 100 percent, whether stimulus by extending the payroll --. >>neil: where is the stimulus in extending rates that are already there. >>guest: why, why, why are economists saying we could have a recession without dealing with the cliff live? by taking so much money out of the market by people who would be spending it or by cutting government spending, either by too large an increase in taxes or by too large a cut in government spending, they are saying that would reverse the economic recovery. the whole package was packaged. >>neil: let me ask where we stand now. i wanted to cut to the chase, and whether you think a deal will be done and what it will look like. >>guest: we will do a deal and we will do a deal that week between christmas and new years, so, i have made a proposal today that i hope can resolve the question of the debt ceiling. when congress authorizes appropriations bills we should authorize at that point whatever spending is nece
, shep. >> that's the fiscal cliff. now hurricane sandy and congress came up with some relief for folks who are still suffering, mike. >> that's right. president obama has asked congress for $64 billion in federal aid for new york, new jersey, and other states hammered by super storm sandy it would provide financial assistance to homeowners, businesses and local and state governments faced with the huge chore of cleaning up and rebuilding after the late october devastating storm. most new york and new jersey officials for the most part praised the request and asked congress to take quick action. speaker boehner's office says it has the paperwork and aides are reviewing it shep? >> shepard: good news. mike, turns out the super storm didn't effect the job market as much as the analysts were expecting. the labor department reported today and we learned that the unemployment rate dropped two tenths of a percent down to 7.7 last month and hiring apparently stayed steady after the storm. also while sandy cost the economy 10s of billions of dollars. the construction agency is announcing a bump
to this debt crisis, the so-called fiscal cliff, could bring about the sequestration that is the slicing of the military right in half. that would be a disaster in many respects. across the world people would see we can't handle our own country well, our own defense well. people across the world would see us failing to fulfill the duty of the constitution to provide for the national defense that's up to congress to do that. but after we get this done -- and let's hope that it does come to pass -- a second challenge is out there, and that's the challenge to glue together a strategy that will keep this country safe and secure. back in the 1947 era george key man sent what's known as the long telegram from moscow to the white house spelling out the rise of the soviet union and its intentions. president truman, my fellow missourian, and his staff glued together the containment strategy which stayed in effect through admiral -- excuse me, through general eisenhower's presidency and later until, as you know, the wall in berlin came tumbling down, and the soviet union imploded on itself. the st
than a year. fiscal cliff negotiations, they're really focused on fixing the debt. how can you fix the debt if you can't fix the economy? if you can't fix the jobs situation? >> oh, boy, this is the magic question this is why people like paulfreaking out and going, wait a minute, we go over the fiscal cliff, it is austerity, it is bad for job creation and that could be a problem. the bigger issue i think in the long-term unemployment problem is we never really dealt with it from the beginning of the jobs crisis. so 12 million people out of work, 40% of them, more than six months, that's insane. but we have not had a real program to get those long-term unemployed back to work. and, you know, frankly, i don't see anything happening in the future. as we look at that fiscal cliff, what does that really do? it says government is going to spend less money, less money means less job training, less ways to get the unemployed back to work. that really says that we're probably going to be stuck with an unemployment problem for a long time. >> so avoiding a fiscal cliff doesn't necessarily me
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